Security and Development Seminar Series

The Center for International Development (CID) at Harvard University has launched its new Security and Development Seminar Series.

Over the 2016-2017 academic year, CID will host four high-level discussions exploring the intersections between security, growth, and development in Latin America. 

Led by Thomas Abt, Senior Research Fellow at CID, and Joao Manoel Pinho de Mello, Lemann Visiting Scholar at the David Rockefeller Center for Latin American Studies, the sessions will feature presentations from prominent academics, practitioners, and policymakers.

The sessions will be open to the public and streamed live on Facebook.

The next sessions are scheduled to take place on February 16th and on April 27th, 2017 from 4:30 to 5:45pm EST at the Perkins Room (R-415), 4th Floor Rubenstein, Harvard Kennedy School.

Session 3 - Upcoming

Inequality, Crime and Development in Latin America

This session will explore the causal relationships between inequality, crime, and violence, understanding the former as a both cause and effect of the latter. The relative importance of proximate vs. root causes of crime and violence will also be debated.

February 16th, 2017 from 4:30 to 5:45pm EST at the Perkins Room (R-415), 4th Floor Rubenstein, Harvard Kennedy School and on Facebook Live.

Speakers:

Joao De MelloJoao Pinho de Mello, Lemann Visiting Scholar at the David Rockefeller Center for Latin American Studies

After receiving his PhD in Economics from Stanford University in 2005, João M P De Mello joined the faculty of the Economics Department at the Catholic University in Rio de Janeiro (PUC-Rio), where he was an assistant (2005-2010) and an associate (2011–2014) professor. He is currently Professor of Economics at Insper. His research has focused on several areas of applied microeconomics. His work has been published in prestigious international academic journals and books, such as the Review of Economic Studies, Review of Economics and Statistics, Economic Journal, Journal of Money, Credit, and Banking, Journal of Economic Behavior and Organization, Review of Finance, Economics of Education Review and Economía (Journal of LACEA). He is an affiliated member of the Brazilian Academy of Sciences and a researcher of the Brazilian National Counsel of Scientific and Technological Development (CNPq), the Brazilian equivalent of the National Science Foundation. Since 2011 he is the co-head of the America Latina Crime and Policy Network (AL CAPONE), a network of researchers sponsored by the Latin American and Caribbean Economic Association (LACEA). In addition to academic activities, Prof. De Mello has worked extensively with the private sector, as a consultant, economic analyst and as expert witness in numerous litigation, arbitration and antitrust cases. He was a partner at Pacifico Gestão de Recursos until he joined the David Rockefeller Center of Latin American Studies as a Lemman Scholar and the Kennedy School of Government as a Fellow. He is currently a columnist with Folha de São Paulo, where he writes a fortnight article on economics.

Rodrigo SoaresRodrigo R. Soares is Lemann Professor of Brazilian Public Policy and International and Public Affairs. Professor Soares’ research centers on development economics, ranging from labor, human capital, and demographic economics, to crime. His work has appeared in various scientific journals, including American Economic Review, Journal of Political Economy, Journal of Public Economics, and Journal of Development Economics, among various others. Before joining Columbia, Soares taught at the Sao Paulo School of Economics-FGV, PUC-Rio, the University of Maryland, and the Harvard School of Public Health.

In 2006, he was awarded the Kenneth J. Arrow Award from the International Health Economics Association for the best paper published in the field of Health Economics. Soares is research fellow at the Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA, Germany), research affiliate at J-PAL Latin America, and associate editor of the Journal of Human Capital, of the Journal of Demographic Economics, and of the IZA Journal of Labor & Development. He has acted as consultant for the World Bank, the Inter-American Development Bank, and state governments in Brazil on issues related to crime and violence, health, and development.  He received his Ph.D. in Economics under the guidance of Gary S. Becker at the University of Chicago in 2002.

Filipe CampanteFilipe R. Campante is Associate Professor of Public Policy at the Harvard Kennedy School. He is interested in political economy, development economics, and urban/regional issues. His research looks at what constrains politicians and policy makers beyond formal checks and balances: cultural norms, institutions, media, political protest. In particular, it has focused on how these informal constraints are affected by the spatial distribution of people and economic activity, by access to information, by the evolution of cultural norms, and by the structure of the economy. He tries to answer these aggregate questions -- what happens to countries or states or cities -- with an applied microeconomic approach.

Campante's work has appeared in leading academic journals such as the American Economic Review and the Quarterly Journal of Economics, among others. It has also received multiple mentions in outlets such as the New York Times, ScienceNPRWashington PostThe Economist, Los Angeles TimesForeign Affairs, Politico, among others. Campante is a Faculty Research Fellow at the National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER), and also affiliated with the Center for International Development, the Taubman Center for State and Local Government, and the Weatherhead Center for International Affairs at Harvard. Born and raised in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, he holds a PhD from Harvard University, an MA from the Pontifical Catholic University of Rio de Janeiro, and a BA from the Federal University of Rio de Janeiro, all in economics.

Emily OwensEmily Owens is an Associate Professor in the Department of Criminology, Law, and Society at the University of California, Irvine. She also holds a secondary appointment in the Department of Economics. Professor Owens studies a wide range of topics in the economics of crime, including policing, sentencing, and the impact of local public policies on criminal behavior. Her research examines how government policies affect the prevalence of criminal activity as well as how agents within the criminal justice system, particularly police, prosecutors, and judges, respond to policy changes. Professor Owens recently completed an NIJ-funded field experiment evaluating a police training program, and is engaged in ongoing research projects on alcohol regulation, immigration policy, and local economic development programs. Professor Owens received her Ph.D. in economics from the University of Maryland-College Park.

This event is co-sponsored with:

DRCLAS logoLatinx caucusLatin American Caucus

 

 

 

 

& Harvard Kennedy School's Brazilian Caucus

Session 4 - Upcoming

Violence, Insecurity, and Development in Latin America

 

Latin America has the highest rates of interpersonal violence in the world. In this session, leading experts explore the causes, correlates, and consequences of this violence, with an emphasis on the Northern Triangle region, which includes El Salvador, Guatemala, and Honduras.

April 27th, 2017 from 4:30 to 5:45pm EST at the Perkins Room (R-415), 4th Floor Rubenstein, Harvard Kennedy School and on Facebook Live.

Speakers:

 

Robert MuggahRobert Muggah co-founded the Igarapé Institute where he oversees research and technology development in Latin America and Africa. He also oversees research at the SecDev Foundation, a cyber analytics group with operations in East Europe, South and Southeast Asia and the Middle East. Robert is affiliated with the University of Oxford, University of San Diego, as well as the Graduate Institute of International and Development Studies, in Switzerland. He has worked with the UN, IADB and World Bank in over 20 countries. Previously, he was the research director of the Small Arms Survey (2000-2011). His research and data visualizations have been featured by the Atlantic, BBC, CNN, the Economist, Financial Times, New York Times, Wired and others. He is an occasional speaker at Davos, TED and the Web Summit. He received his DPhil from the University of Oxford.

 

Daniel OrtegaDaniel Ortega is the Director of impact evaluation and policy learning at CAF. He has a Ph.D. in Economics, University of Maryland College Park (August 2002). M.A. in Economics, University of Maryland College Park (December 2000). B.A. in Economics, Universidad Central de Venezuela, Caracas (July 1997). At the moment, Daniel is the Director of Impact Evaluation and Policy Learning at CAF and associate Professor (Adjunct) at Instituto de Estudios Superiores de Administración (IESA) since 2004.

Previously Daniel was the Impact Evaluation Coordinator and Senior Economist at CAF from 2006 to 2014. He also was Research Economist at the Economic Advisory Office to the National Assembly of Venezuela (2002-2004)

 

Thomas Abt is a Senior Research Fellow and Adjunct Lecturer in Public Policy with the Center for International Development. Both in the United States and globally, Thomas teaches, studies, and writes on the use of evidence-informed approaches to reducing gun, gang, and youth violence, among other topics. He also serves as a Senior Fellow with the Igarapé Institute in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, and as an Advisory Board Member to the Police Executive Programme at the University of Cambridge. Before joining Harvard, Thomas served as Deputy Secretary for Public Safety to Governor Andrew Cuomo in New York, where he oversaw all criminal justice and homeland security agencies, including the Divisions of Corrections and Community Supervision, Criminal Justice Services, Homeland Security and Emergency Services, and the State Police. During his tenure, Thomas led the development of New York’s GIVE (Gun-Involved Violence Elimination) Initiative, which employs evidence-informed, data-driven approaches to reduce violence.

Session 2

Transnational Crime: Gangs, Guns, Drugs, and Development in Latin America
This session will explore how trafficking in illicit drugs, weapons, and persons by transnational criminal organizations impedes development in many Latin American countries.

Click the menu icon on the top left of the video player to reveal all the videos from the session.


Speakers:
Thomas Abt, Innovation in Citizen Security Project, CID

Thomas Abt is a Senior Research Fellow and Adjunct Lecturer in Public Policy with the Center for International Development. Both in the United States and globally, Thomas teaches, studies, and writes on the use of evidence-informed approaches to reducing gun, gang, and youth violence, among other topics. He also serves as a Senior Fellow with the Igarapé Institute in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, and as an Advisory Board Member to the Police Executive Programme at the University of Cambridge. Before joining Harvard, Thomas served as Deputy Secretary for Public Safety to Governor Andrew Cuomo in New York, where he oversaw all criminal justice and homeland security agencies, including the Divisions of Corrections and Community Supervision, Criminal Justice Services, Homeland Security and Emergency Services, and the State Police. During his tenure, Thomas led the development of New York’s GIVE (Gun-Involved Violence Elimination) Initiative, which employs evidence-informed, data-driven approaches to reduce violence.
 

Daniel Mejia, Secretary of Security of Bogota, Colombia

Daniel Mejia is Secretary of Security of Bogota, Colombia, where he is in charge of leading security and justice policies in the city of Bogota. Before becoming the first Secretary of Security of Bogota, Daniel was Associate Professor in the Department of Economics and Director of the Research Center on Drugs and Security (CESED) at Universidad de los Andes in Bogota, Colombia, where he taught since 2006. He received a BA and MA in Economics from Universidad de los Andes and a MA and PhD in economics from Brown University. Prior to joining Universidad de los Andes he worked as a researcher at the Central Bank of Colombia and Fedesarrollo. Daniel he has been actively involved in a research agenda whose main objective is to provide independent economic evaluations of security and anti-drug policies implemented in Colombia. In 2008 he was awarded Fedesarrollos´s German Botero de los Ríos prize for economic research. Daniel has designed and evaluated different interventions aimed at reducing crime in cities such as Medellin, Bogota and Cali. Among these, Daniel designed (together with the National Police and the Ministry of Defense) a hotspots policing intervention in Medellin and carried out an independent evaluation of this intervention. Also, he has evaluated the effects of the installation of CCTV cameras on crime in Medellin and the effects of the restriction of alcohol sales on crime in Bogota. Daniel, together with Alejandro Gaviria, published in 2013 the book “Políticas antidroga en Colombia: éxitos, fracasos y extravíos” (Anti-drug policies in Colombia: successes, failures and lost opportunities) at Universidad de los Andes, in Bogota. Between 2011 and 2012, Daniel was a member of the Advisory Commission on Criminal Policy and more recently he was the President of the Colombian Government´s Drug Policy Advisory Commission. In March 2015 Daniel was awarded the Juan Luis Londoño prize, awarded every other year to the best Colombian economist under 40.

Steven Dudley, Co-director, InSight Crime, Wilson Center

Steven Dudley is the co-founder and co-director of InSight Crime. Dudley is also a senior fellow at American University's Center for Latin American and Latino Studies in Washington DC. He is the former Bureau Chief of The Miami Herald in the Andean Region and the author of "Walking Ghosts: Murder and Guerrilla Politics inColombia" (Routledge 2004). Dudley has also reported from Haiti, Brazil, Nicaragua, Cuba and Miami for National Public Radio and The Washington Post, among others. Dudley has a BA in Latin American History from Cornell University and an MA in Latin American Studies from the University of Texas at Austin. He was awarded the Knight Fellowship at Stanford University in 2007, and is a member of the International Consortium of Investigative Journalists. In 2012 to 2013, he was a visiting fellow at the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars.


Joao De MelloJoão M P De Mello, Lemann Visiting Scholar at the David Rockefeller Center for Latin American Studies

After receiving his PhD in Economics from Stanford University in 2005, João M P De Mello joined the faculty of the Economics Department at the Catholic University in Rio de Janeiro (PUC-Rio), where he was an assistant (2005-2010) and an associate (2011–2014) professor. He is currently Professor of Economics at Insper. His research has focused on several areas of applied microeconomics. His work has been published in prestigious international academic journals and books, such as the Review of Economic Studies, Review of Economics and Statistics, Economic Journal, Journal of Money, Credit, and Banking, Journal of Economic Behavior and Organization, Review of Finance, Economics of Education Review and Economía (Journal of LACEA). He is an affiliated member of the Brazilian Academy of Sciences and a researcher of the Brazilian National Counsel of Scientific and Technological Development (CNPq), the Brazilian equivalent of the National Science Foundation. Since 2011 he is the co-head of the America Latina Crime and Policy Network (AL CAPONE), a network of researchers sponsored by the Latin American and Caribbean Economic Association (LACEA). In addition to academic activities, Prof. De Mello has worked extensively with the private sector, as a consultant, economic analyst and as expert witness in numerous litigation, arbitration and antitrust cases. He was a partner at Pacifico Gestão de Recursos until he joined the David Rockefeller Center of Latin American Studies as a Lemman Scholar and the Kennedy School of Government as a Fellow. He is currently a columnist with Folha de São Paulo, where he writes a fortnight article on economics.

Session 1

Corruption, Impunity & Development in Latin America

This session explores how corruption and impunity obstruct development in Latin America, with a focus on Mexico.

Click the menu icon on the top left of the video player to reveal all the videos from the session. Related reading materials are at the bottom of the page.


Speakers:

Ricardo HausmannRicardo Hausmann, Director, CID

Ricardo Hausmann is Director of the Center for International Development and Professor of the Practice of Economic Development at Harvard University. Previously, he served as the first Chief Economist of the Inter-American Development Bank (1994-2000), where he created the Research Department. He has served as Minister of Planning of Venezuela (1992-1993) and as a member of the Board of the Central Bank of Venezuela. He also served as Chair of the IMF-World Bank Development Committee. Hausmann was Professor of Economics at the Instituto de Estudios Superiores de Administracion (IESA) (1985-1991) in Caracas, where he founded the Center for Public Policy. His research interests include issues of growth, macroeconomic stability, international finance, and the social dimensions of development. He holds a PhD in economics from Cornell University.


Thomas Abt, Innovation in Citizen Security Project, CID

Thomas Abt is a Senior Research Fellow and Adjunct Lecturer in Public Policy with the Center for International Development. Both in the United States and globally, Thomas teaches, studies, and writes on the use of evidence-informed approaches to reducing gun, gang, and youth violence, among other topics. He also serves as a Senior Fellow with the Igarapé Institute in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, and as an Advisory Board Member to the Police Executive Programme at the University of Cambridge. Before joining Harvard, Thomas served as Deputy Secretary for Public Safety to Governor Andrew Cuomo in New York, where he oversaw all criminal justice and homeland security agencies, including the Divisions of Corrections and Community Supervision, Criminal Justice Services, Homeland Security and Emergency Services, and the State Police. During his tenure, Thomas led the development of New York’s GIVE (Gun-Involved Violence Elimination) Initiative, which employs evidence-informed, data-driven approaches to reduce violence.
 

Lourdes MoralesLourdes Morales, Associate Professor, Centro de Investigación y Docencia Económica (CIDE)

Lourdes has a Ph.D. in Political Sciences from La Sorbonne University Paris 3. She has a Masters in Political Communication from University Paris 1, and a Bachelor in Communications from Iberoamericana University. She was the Director of Alianza Civica and of Mexicobserva and participated in the Citizen Forum of Oaxaca. She is an associate Professor at the Centro de Investigación y Docencia Económica (CIDE), where she currently runs the office of accountability projects. Lourdes has over 10 years of teaching experience in higher education in both public and private institutions. She has coordinated research on citizen participation, electoral processes in indigenous regions with a focus on gender issues, transparency and accountability. She is the author and co-author of articles and books related to those topics.
 

Marco FernandezMarco Fernandez, Research Professor, School of Government, Tec de Monterrey; Research Associate, México Evalúa

Marco Antonio Fernández is a research professor in the School of Government at Tec de Monterrey, a researcher associate at Mexico Evalua and scholar at the Woodrow Wilson Center in Washington DC. He specializes in political economy, particularly on education policy, decentralization, clientelism, transparency, corruption and the challenges of good governance. He received his B.A. in Political Science at ITAM, Mexico. He has a M.A. and a Ph.D. in Political Science from Duke University. He was fellow at the Center for U.S. – Mexican Studies from 2010 to 2011. He has worked as a consultant for different international organizations, including the World Bank, the Inter-American Development Bank, the OECD and the Economic Social Council from United Nations. He has worked as an adviser in the Mexican Congress and Senate, as well as has served as senior adviser for the Office of the President and for the Education Minister in Mexico. He is currently working on different research projects, including (1) an analysis of the institutions in charge of fighting corruption in Mexico, (2) the challenges of fiscal transparency in emerging economies and its role to curb the abuse of public budgets, and (3) the politics of education reform in Mexico. 

Related content:

Fighting Corruption Won't End Poverty - R. Hausmann for Project Syndicate

Mexico: The Fight Against Corruption - Research paper by Mauricio Merino Huerta